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Class of 2019: Inaugural Year of IMPACT’s Medical Writing Fellowship Program

January 28, 2019 | Laurel Kartchner, PhD, Amritha Kidiyoor, PhD, and Brandi Schuster, PhD, Medical Writing Fellows │ Medical Writing Services

More and more recent graduates want to break away from bench science but don’t know how or lack the industry experience that many pharmaceutical companies are now looking for. To facilitate this transition, some CROs like IMPACT have begun to provide fellowship and internship programs that offer hands-on experience for those moving from academia into a career in regulatory medical writing.

As of Spring 2018, IMPACT offers a unique full-time Medical Writing Fellowship with a goal of enabling aspiring scientists to become regulatory medical writers. The program is designed to focus on 3 main areas: 1) training and professional development, 2) quality control (QC), and 3) regulatory medical writing. This post summarizes our experience as the first group of fellows at IMPACT.

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Current Topics in Orphan Drug Development

December 14, 2018 | Kathryn Tworkoski, PhD, RAC, Senior Clinical Research Scientist  │ Regulatory AffairsMedical Writing, Drug Development Consulting

Long-time readers of this blog will recall (with great enthusiasm, I’m sure) our previous posts on rare diseases, INDs, preparation for pre-IND meetings, and the submission and maintenance of INDs.  But in October 2018, the FDA released new draft guidance outlining best practices for early drug development and pre-IND meetings for rare diseases.  Given the near-perfect cross-over potential, we thought this was a sign that it was time to review the guidance, as well as rare diseases as a whole.  So in the interest of appeasing the fates, let’s get this show on the road!

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Pro Tips for Protocol Writing

September 28, 2018 | Kathryn Tworkoski, PhD, RAC, Senior Clinical Research Scientist  │ Medical Writing Services

Great news; your team has been given the green light to conduct a new clinical study with your favorite compound!  It’s what you’ve been waiting to hear, and now it’s time to seize the opportunity and run full steam ahead!

But first, you have to write a protocol.  The basic structure and content of a protocol are described in the International Council for Harmonisation Good Clinical Practice E6 guideline.  As you would expect, protocols should ultimately outline and justify the planned clinical study.  The type of information presented in protocols includes background information, trial objectives and assessments, trial design, subject selection and treatment, and a brief overview of the planned statistical analyses.

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Getting in Tune: The ICH Process of Harmonizing Guidelines

August 16, 2018 | Cheryl Ainslie, PhD, Clinical Research Scientist II  │ Regulatory Affairs Services

Image from kisspng.com

“The only constant is change,” commonly attributed to the Ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus, is as true today as it was in 500 BCE.  In the global industry of drug development, the conduct and reporting of clinical trials may change to a small degree with every new study proposed.  But what happens when there is growth or momentum for change that could impact the industry as a whole?

The Role of ICH

In a previous post, Ilana discussed the International Council for Harmonisation (ICH, previously called the International Conference on Harmonisation) guideline for clinical study report authoring, Efficacy Guideline 3 (E3).  The goal of the post you are reading is to take a step backward and explain how ICH guidelines are proposed, evaluated, and (possibly) adopted.  This process is key to understanding the function and operation of ICH to ensure that drug development is highly efficient and scientifically sound.

Created in 1990, the ICH of Technical Requirements for Pharmaceuticals for Human Use comprises experts from regulatory authorities and the pharmaceutical industry in the EU, US, and Japan.

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Helpful Tips I Learned at the AMWA Carolinas Spring Conference

July 10, 2018 | Caroline Drucker, PhD, Clinical Research Scientist II  │ Medical Writing Services

In May, the Carolinas Chapter of the American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) held its annual spring conference at the Friday Center in Chapel Hill, NC. With this location convenient to Research Triangle Park, I was fortunately able to attend, meet other medical writers in the area, and learn about an array of topics from the 6 speakers and other attendees. The subjects ranged from the technical (efficient use of Microsoft Word) to the writing process (strategies for focused authoring, approaches for efficacy and safety summaries in marketing applications, and editing your own work) to the “softer” skills involved in medical writing (such as interpersonal interactions and working from home).

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